History

History of Die Waenhuis House

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 | 0 comments

This Romantic old home was built in the first half of the nineteenth century, right in the founding years of George (1811) when the town was, according to C. Sayers (Looking back on George) “a straggling town, more like a thickly populated farm with little more than 700 residents in total and four named streets on the charts, York, Caledon, Courtney and Meade. This house with its huge plot right down to the river was probably hovering on the forest edge. It originally had a thatched roof and a rounded (leg of mutton) gable.

which unfortunately was probably lost in a fire. However the original yellow wood floors and ceilings and the wide stable front door and sash windows still tell the story of almost 170+ years of coming and going. In those days Sayer tells us the buck wagon was at the height of popularity in George, bringing products from the farms on market day, the ox wagon was the means of transport across the mountain for the precious product of timber from George’s forests and the main trades of town revolved around wood cutting, transport driving and furniture making, therefore the name DieWaenhuis or Coach House

fits the picture perfectly. We see our calling here to upkeep this old legacy of George and share it with others.

Read More

History of Die Waenhuis House

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 | 0 comments

This Romantic old home was built in the first half of the nineteenth century, right in the founding years of George (1811) when the town was, according to C. Sayers (Looking back on George) “a straggling town, more like a thickly populated farm with little more than 700 residents in total and four named streets on the charts, York, Caledon, Courtney and Meade. This house with its huge plot right down to the river was probably hovering on the forest edge. It originally had a thatched roof and a rounded (leg of mutton) gable.

which unfortunately was probably lost in a fire. However the original yellow wood floors and ceilings and the wide stable front door and sash windows still tell the story of almost 170+ years of coming and going. In those days Sayer tells us the buck wagon was at the height of popularity in George, bringing products from the farms on market day, the ox wagon was the means of transport across the mountain for the precious product of timber from George’s forests and the main trades of town revolved around wood cutting, transport driving and furniture making, therefore the name DieWaenhuis or Coach House

fits the picture perfectly. We see our calling here to upkeep this old legacy of George and share it with others.

Read More

History of Die Waenhuis House

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 | 0 comments

This Romantic old home was built in the first half of the nineteenth century, right in the founding years of George (1811) when the town was, according to C. Sayers (Looking back on George) “a straggling town, more like a thickly populated farm with little more than 700 residents in total and four named streets on the charts, York, Caledon, Courtney and Meade. This house with its huge plot right down to the river was probably hovering on the forest edge. It originally had a thatched roof and a rounded (leg of mutton) gable.

which unfortunately was probably lost in a fire. However the original yellow wood floors and ceilings and the wide stable front door and sash windows still tell the story of almost 170+ years of coming and going. In those days Sayer tells us the buck wagon was at the height of popularity in George, bringing products from the farms on market day, the ox wagon was the means of transport across the mountain for the precious product of timber from George’s forests and the main trades of town revolved around wood cutting, transport driving and furniture making, therefore the name DieWaenhuis or Coach House

fits the picture perfectly. We see our calling here to upkeep this old legacy of George and share it with others.

Read More

History of Die Waenhuis House

Posted on Nov 7, 2012 | 0 comments

This Romantic old home was built in the first half of the nineteenth century, right in the founding years of George (1811) when the town was, according to C. Sayers (Looking back on George) “a straggling town, more like a thickly populated farm with little more than 700 residents in total and four named streets on the charts, York, Caledon, Courtney and Meade. This house with its huge plot right down to the river was probably hovering on the forest edge. It originally had a thatched roof and a rounded (leg of mutton) gable.

which unfortunately was probably lost in a fire. However the original yellow wood floors and ceilings and the wide stable front door and sash windows still tell the story of almost 170+ years of coming and going. In those days Sayer tells us the buck wagon was at the height of popularity in George, bringing products from the farms on market day, the ox wagon was the means of transport across the mountain for the precious product of timber from George’s forests and the main trades of town revolved around wood cutting, transport driving and furniture making, therefore the name DieWaenhuis or Coach House

fits the picture perfectly. We see our calling here to upkeep this old legacy of George and share it with others.

Read More